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Thursday, February 17, 2005

The American Military is Better Than This

Iraqi Died While Hung From Wrists

Associated Press
By SETH HETTENA

SAN DIEGO - An Iraqi whose corpse was photographed with grinning U.S. soldiers at Abu Ghraib died under CIA (news - web sites) interrogation while in a position condemned by human rights groups as torture — suspended by his wrists, with his hands cuffed behind his back, according to reports reviewed by The Associated Press.

The death of the prisoner, Manadel al-Jamadi, became known last year when the Abu Ghraib prison scandal broke. The U.S. military said back then that the death had been ruled a homicide. But the exact circumstances under which the man died were not disclosed at the time.

The prisoner died in a position known as "Palestinian hanging," the documents reviewed by The AP show. It is unclear whether that position was approved by the Bush administration for use in CIA interrogations.

The spy agency, which faces congressional scrutiny over its detention and interrogation of terror suspects at the Baghdad prison and elsewhere, declined to comment for this story, as did the Justice Department (news - web sites).

Al-Jamadi was one of the CIA's "ghost" detainees at Abu Ghraib — prisoners being held secretly by the agency.

His death in November 2003 became public with the release of photos of Abu Ghraib guards giving a thumbs-up over his bruised and puffy-faced corpse, which had been packed in ice. One of those guards was Pvt. Charles Graner, who last month received 10 years in a military prison for abusing detainees.

Al-Jamadi died in a prison shower room during about a half-hour of questioning, before interrogators could extract any information, according to the documents, which consist of statements from Army prison guards to investigators with the military and the CIA's Inspector General's office.

One Army guard, Sgt. Jeffery Frost, said the prisoner's arms were stretched behind him in a way he had never before seen. Frost told investigators he was surprised al-Jamadi's arms "didn't pop out of their sockets," according to a summary of his interview.

Frost and other guards had been summoned to reposition al-Jamadi, who an interrogator said was not cooperating. As the guards released the shackles and lowered al-Jamadi, blood gushed from his mouth "as if a faucet had been turned on," according to the interview summary...
This is extremely disturbing, to say the least. What kind of supervision is going on over there if soldiers can spend their time taking pictures around a corpse of someone it seems they MURDERED. I'm all for aggressive interrogation techniques, but what this article describes seems to cross the line into torture. I hope to God this is not happening on a regular basis. How can we as Americans expect to ever persuade the international community of our good intentions in places like Iraq, if idiotic soldiers commit acts like this in our country's name? The guy got 10 years (not strict enough in my view, he's helped damage our country's reputation), but what the hell are his commanding officers doing? Conservatives need to be just as angry about this kind of thing as liberals. This hands behind the back thing sounds very similar to techniques the North Vietnamese used on our own POWs in Vietnam. I do NOT support this. We as a country need to set up rules and regulations IMMEDIATELY that tell our soldiers what they can and cannot do when carrying out an interrogation. Otherwise acts like this will continue to happen - and continue to drag America's name through the mud.


 
conservativerebel.blogspot.com: The American Military is Better Than This <body>

conservativerebel.blogspot.com

Thursday, February 17, 2005

The American Military is Better Than This

Iraqi Died While Hung From Wrists

Associated Press
By SETH HETTENA

SAN DIEGO - An Iraqi whose corpse was photographed with grinning U.S. soldiers at Abu Ghraib died under CIA (news - web sites) interrogation while in a position condemned by human rights groups as torture — suspended by his wrists, with his hands cuffed behind his back, according to reports reviewed by The Associated Press.

The death of the prisoner, Manadel al-Jamadi, became known last year when the Abu Ghraib prison scandal broke. The U.S. military said back then that the death had been ruled a homicide. But the exact circumstances under which the man died were not disclosed at the time.

The prisoner died in a position known as "Palestinian hanging," the documents reviewed by The AP show. It is unclear whether that position was approved by the Bush administration for use in CIA interrogations.

The spy agency, which faces congressional scrutiny over its detention and interrogation of terror suspects at the Baghdad prison and elsewhere, declined to comment for this story, as did the Justice Department (news - web sites).

Al-Jamadi was one of the CIA's "ghost" detainees at Abu Ghraib — prisoners being held secretly by the agency.

His death in November 2003 became public with the release of photos of Abu Ghraib guards giving a thumbs-up over his bruised and puffy-faced corpse, which had been packed in ice. One of those guards was Pvt. Charles Graner, who last month received 10 years in a military prison for abusing detainees.

Al-Jamadi died in a prison shower room during about a half-hour of questioning, before interrogators could extract any information, according to the documents, which consist of statements from Army prison guards to investigators with the military and the CIA's Inspector General's office.

One Army guard, Sgt. Jeffery Frost, said the prisoner's arms were stretched behind him in a way he had never before seen. Frost told investigators he was surprised al-Jamadi's arms "didn't pop out of their sockets," according to a summary of his interview.

Frost and other guards had been summoned to reposition al-Jamadi, who an interrogator said was not cooperating. As the guards released the shackles and lowered al-Jamadi, blood gushed from his mouth "as if a faucet had been turned on," according to the interview summary...
This is extremely disturbing, to say the least. What kind of supervision is going on over there if soldiers can spend their time taking pictures around a corpse of someone it seems they MURDERED. I'm all for aggressive interrogation techniques, but what this article describes seems to cross the line into torture. I hope to God this is not happening on a regular basis. How can we as Americans expect to ever persuade the international community of our good intentions in places like Iraq, if idiotic soldiers commit acts like this in our country's name? The guy got 10 years (not strict enough in my view, he's helped damage our country's reputation), but what the hell are his commanding officers doing? Conservatives need to be just as angry about this kind of thing as liberals. This hands behind the back thing sounds very similar to techniques the North Vietnamese used on our own POWs in Vietnam. I do NOT support this. We as a country need to set up rules and regulations IMMEDIATELY that tell our soldiers what they can and cannot do when carrying out an interrogation. Otherwise acts like this will continue to happen - and continue to drag America's name through the mud.