<body><script type="text/javascript"> function setAttributeOnload(object, attribute, val) { if(window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', function(){ object[attribute] = val; }, false); } else { window.attachEvent('onload', function(){ object[attribute] = val; }); } } </script> <div id="navbar-iframe-container"></div> <script type="text/javascript" src="https://apis.google.com/js/plusone.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript"> gapi.load("gapi.iframes:gapi.iframes.style.bubble", function() { if (gapi.iframes && gapi.iframes.getContext) { gapi.iframes.getContext().openChild({ url: 'https://www.blogger.com/navbar.g?targetBlogID\x3d10121704\x26blogName\x3dconservativerebel.blogspot.com\x26publishMode\x3dPUBLISH_MODE_BLOGSPOT\x26navbarType\x3dBLUE\x26layoutType\x3dCLASSIC\x26searchRoot\x3dhttp://conservativerebel.blogspot.com/search\x26blogLocale\x3den_US\x26v\x3d2\x26homepageUrl\x3dhttp://conservativerebel.blogspot.com/\x26vt\x3d8506480323418746814', where: document.getElementById("navbar-iframe-container"), id: "navbar-iframe" }); } }); </script>

conservativerebel.blogspot.com

Sunday, February 20, 2005

Drug War Attacks Our Wallets

CAGW Highlights Wasteful Spending In
War on Drugs


(Washington, D.C.) - Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW) today called upon the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) to shape up or ship out by significantly reducing funding and re-organizing its high-intensity drug trafficking program, which has devolved into little more than another method for members of Congress to bring tax dollars home to fund superfluous projects.

“The high-intensity drug trafficking program was started to combat drugs entering our borders,” said CAGW President Tom Schatz. “But, with non-border states like Colorado and Nebraska receiving money, insufficient dollars are moving to the most at-risk states, like Arizona, California, and Texas.”

The high-intensity drug trafficking area (HIDTA) program was established in 1988 to combat drug distribution, manufacturing, and importation in areas highly susceptible to such practices. The program began in 1990, concentrating its efforts on five “gateway” areas for drugs entering the U.S.: Los Angeles, Houston, New York/New Jersey, South Florida and the southwest border.

There are now 26 high-intensity areas, including the Midwest (Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska) and the Appalachian Region (Kentucky, Tennessee and West Virginia.) The program’s funds were first set aside to help target high-intensity areas and bar drugs from crossing U.S. borders on land, but as a result of the overly broad distribution of funding, success in the most vital states has been negligible. For example, during the last 14 years adult drug arrests in Arizona—one of the original high-risk states—have increased by about 90 percent statewide, costing law enforcement millions of dollars that could be put to better use in homeland security.

“Members of Congress are funneling these dollars away from key areas and back to their own districts,” said Schatz. “While drugs are everywhere in the U.S., this program has been abused by Congress—the dollars are spread so thinly now they do little to help anyone.”

Methamphetamine labs area most commonly highlighted by members of Congress who are attempting to bring funding to their districts under the HIDTA. Although meth labs are increasing in the Midwest, California still accounts for 75 to 90 percent of the nation’s illegal meth production.

CAGW has highlighted four tiers of concern regarding the U.S. government’s war on drugs: media/marketing campaigns, high-intensity trafficking programs, federal efforts to squash medicinal marijuana use and the Colombian Drug War project. The war on drugs has cost taxpayers more than $25 billion over 25 years. However, a report from the Washington Office on Latin America shows that the wholesale and retail prices of cocaine and heroin at or close to their lowest levels in 22 years; increased supply caused by the failure of the war on drugs can be blamed for the reduced cost.

See Press Release here.


Just further proof of what most Americans already know. The Drug War is being run ineffectively, doing nothing but cost us more and more yet problems get worse and worse. Only the thousandth example of how throwing money at something doesn't solve the problem, something obviously needs to be done. They need to hold congressional meetings and completely overhaul the entire way we handle the war on drugs. If drugs are cheaper than ever, we're obviously doing something wrong.

I'm not for the libertarian position of legalizing all drugs, although I do firmly believe that marijuana should be legalized. Why are we locking up people for smoking a little bit of reefer? Not only does it cost tons of money to keep it criminalized, it just seems cruel and unusual. The government would be much better off legalizing pot and taxing it for revenue. Marijuana isn't nearly as harmful as say, tobacco or alcohol.


 
conservativerebel.blogspot.com: Drug War Attacks Our Wallets <body>

conservativerebel.blogspot.com

Sunday, February 20, 2005

Drug War Attacks Our Wallets

CAGW Highlights Wasteful Spending In
War on Drugs


(Washington, D.C.) - Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW) today called upon the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) to shape up or ship out by significantly reducing funding and re-organizing its high-intensity drug trafficking program, which has devolved into little more than another method for members of Congress to bring tax dollars home to fund superfluous projects.

“The high-intensity drug trafficking program was started to combat drugs entering our borders,” said CAGW President Tom Schatz. “But, with non-border states like Colorado and Nebraska receiving money, insufficient dollars are moving to the most at-risk states, like Arizona, California, and Texas.”

The high-intensity drug trafficking area (HIDTA) program was established in 1988 to combat drug distribution, manufacturing, and importation in areas highly susceptible to such practices. The program began in 1990, concentrating its efforts on five “gateway” areas for drugs entering the U.S.: Los Angeles, Houston, New York/New Jersey, South Florida and the southwest border.

There are now 26 high-intensity areas, including the Midwest (Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska) and the Appalachian Region (Kentucky, Tennessee and West Virginia.) The program’s funds were first set aside to help target high-intensity areas and bar drugs from crossing U.S. borders on land, but as a result of the overly broad distribution of funding, success in the most vital states has been negligible. For example, during the last 14 years adult drug arrests in Arizona—one of the original high-risk states—have increased by about 90 percent statewide, costing law enforcement millions of dollars that could be put to better use in homeland security.

“Members of Congress are funneling these dollars away from key areas and back to their own districts,” said Schatz. “While drugs are everywhere in the U.S., this program has been abused by Congress—the dollars are spread so thinly now they do little to help anyone.”

Methamphetamine labs area most commonly highlighted by members of Congress who are attempting to bring funding to their districts under the HIDTA. Although meth labs are increasing in the Midwest, California still accounts for 75 to 90 percent of the nation’s illegal meth production.

CAGW has highlighted four tiers of concern regarding the U.S. government’s war on drugs: media/marketing campaigns, high-intensity trafficking programs, federal efforts to squash medicinal marijuana use and the Colombian Drug War project. The war on drugs has cost taxpayers more than $25 billion over 25 years. However, a report from the Washington Office on Latin America shows that the wholesale and retail prices of cocaine and heroin at or close to their lowest levels in 22 years; increased supply caused by the failure of the war on drugs can be blamed for the reduced cost.

See Press Release here.


Just further proof of what most Americans already know. The Drug War is being run ineffectively, doing nothing but cost us more and more yet problems get worse and worse. Only the thousandth example of how throwing money at something doesn't solve the problem, something obviously needs to be done. They need to hold congressional meetings and completely overhaul the entire way we handle the war on drugs. If drugs are cheaper than ever, we're obviously doing something wrong.

I'm not for the libertarian position of legalizing all drugs, although I do firmly believe that marijuana should be legalized. Why are we locking up people for smoking a little bit of reefer? Not only does it cost tons of money to keep it criminalized, it just seems cruel and unusual. The government would be much better off legalizing pot and taxing it for revenue. Marijuana isn't nearly as harmful as say, tobacco or alcohol.